IT 

Pascal-based Nvidia Titan X is graphics card overkill of the highest order

With the rise of 4K and graphics-intensive VR, more strain is being placed on graphics cards. A couple of months ago, Nvidia responded to this call for more power with its GTX 1080, which the company called “the new king” of graphics cards. Well, the king is dead, long live the king, because now Nvidia has unveiled an updated version of the Titan X, which takes Nvidia’s Pascal architecture and cranks it up to the absolute max. With maximum performance sitting at 11 teraflops, the new Titan X is around 60…

Read More
IT 

Why the Virtual-Reality Hype is About to Come Crashing Down

Makers of virtual-reality headsets think 2016 will be the year of VR. The experience “is radically different than any computing experience you’ve had before,” says Marc Metis, a vice president atHTC Corp., maker of the Vive headset. Content creators, however, tell a different story. VR isn’t ready for prime time. This gap between expectations and reality means the VR hype train is about to crash into a wall. In my experience, VR demos can be very impressive. The problem is that most are just that—demos.As new, highly touted headsets arrive this year, how much…

Read More
IT 

Quantum computers may revolutionize chemistry

As powerful as today’s traditional supercomputers are, they still struggle greatly with modeling chemical systems. For example, chemists still don’t fully understand exactly how bacteria produce fertilizer at room temperature. Considering the fact that fertilizer production is inefficient and consumes as much as two percent of the world’s energy each year, solving its mysteries could save billions of dollars. Now, researchers from Harvard, Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, UC Santa Barbara, Tufts University and University College London are one step closer to being able to solve that and other difficult models…

Read More
IT 

Computer scientists find way to make all that glitters more realistic in computer graphics

Iron Man’s suit. Captain America’s shield. The Batmobile. These all could look a lot more realistic thanks to a new algorithm developed by a team of U.S. computer graphics experts. The researchers, led by Professor Ravi Ramamoorthi at the University of California San Diego, have created a method to improve how computer graphics software reproduces the way light interacts with extremely small details, called glints, on the surface of a wide range of materials, including metallic car paints, metal finishes for electronics and injection-molded plastic finishes. The method developed by…

Read More
IT 

Computers in your clothes? A milestone for wearable electronics

Researchers who are working to develop wearable electronics have reached a milestone: They are able to embroider circuits into fabric with 0.1 mm precision — the perfect size to integrate electronic components such as sensors and computer memory devices into clothing. With this advance, the Ohio State University researchers have taken the next step toward the design of functional textiles — clothes that gather, store, or transmit digital information. With further development, the technology could lead to shirts that act as antennas for your smart phone or tablet, workout clothes…

Read More
IT 

Fastest home internet access ever rolls out in US city

Some residents of Minneapolis, Minnesota, received a holiday gift this December – the fastest home internet speed available just about anywhere in the world. US Internet, based in the Minneapolis suburb of Minnetonka, announced this week that it has begun rolling out 10 gigabit per second internet access, ten times faster than Google Fiber‘s much-publicized gigabit connections, and similarplanned networks in the UK. It’s also much faster than typical speeds in South Korea, often cited as having the fastest average connections in the world. The company says that compared to the…

Read More
IT 

Superbook gives Android smartphones a laptop form factor

Today’s smartphones are incredibly powerful, with the ability to run productivity apps and games that would have been impossible even on full-blown desktop computers not so long ago. The problem is, the size and touch input of their displays isn’t always the best way to take advantage of all that power under the hood. Andromium’s new Superbook is designed to change that, giving an Android smartphone an 11.6-inch screen, full-size keyboard and trackpad. Andromium isn’t the first company to attempt to leverage the power of a smartphone to provide the…

Read More
IT 

Crucial Hurdle Overcome in Quantum Computing

The significant advance, by a team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney appears today in the international journal Nature. “What we have is a game changer,” said team leader Andrew Dzurak, Scientia Professor and Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility at UNSW. “We’ve demonstrated a two-qubit logic gate – the central building block of a quantum computer – and, significantly, done it in silicon. Because we use essentially the same device technology as existing computer chips, we believe it will be much easier to manufacture a full-scale…

Read More
IT 

How Nanotechnology Poised to Change Medicine Forever — and What’s Holding it Back

Science fiction movies such as Ant-Man and Fantastic Voyage excite us about the possibility of shrinking ourselves down to the subatomic level. In the Disney version of The Sword in the Stone, Merlin defeats the sorceress Madam Mim in a shape shifting battle by turning into a microbe which makes her sick. All of these touch upon the power that comes with being able to control what is infinitesimally small. In reality, science has made great progress in this regard. But we’re not quite there yet. The prefix nano comes from ancient Greek meaning, “dwarf.”…

Read More
IT 

What Can We Do with a Quantum Computing?

When I was in middle school, I read a popular book about programming in BASIC (which was the most popular programming language for beginners at that time). But it was 1986, and we did not have computers at home or school yet. So, I could only write computer programs on paper, without being able to try them on an actual computer. Surprisingly, I am now doing something similar—I am studying how to solve problems on a quantum computer. We do not yet have a fully functional quantum computer. But I am…

Read More